Off-Canvas

Harding Courses

The following gives a brief description of each course at Harding High School. Read each one carefully before making your final selection.

Course Descriptions

Art

Courses

Art I, 1/2 credit (wt. 1.0)

Drawing, painting, ceramics, graphic design, printmaking, and sculpture will all be touched on in this class. The elements and principles of design will be the foundation for all projects. There will be written work, tests and a final exam.

Honors Art I, 1/2 credit (wt. 1.5)

In this honors version of ART 1, students will do the work expected of the regular weighted Art 1 class as well as additional projects to be determined by instructor and student. Coursework will be rigorous and more in depth. Some out-of-class work will be required.

Crafts, 1 credit (wt. 1.0)

Recommendation: Art I.

An exploration of unique and functional works of art will include fiber arts, basketry, ceramics, jewelry-making, masks, and book-making. Emphasis will be placed on design, functionality, and craftsmanship. Each student will be responsible for creating a presentation and learning opportunity with the craft of their choice. There will be written work and semester exam.

DIGITAL IMAGE MANIPULATION (DIGITAL ARTS I ), 1/2 credit (wt. 2.0 CCP)

Recommendation: Art 1.

In this class we will be covering many different aspects of digital image manipulation from editing images to creating vector graphics to working with 3D objects. This class will prepare you to be able to edit images for projects in a work environment to creating images as a hobby. All classwork is done on the computer using the latest version of Adobe Photoshop CC. Grades will be based on completed projects, journal entries and book work.

DIGITAL ARTS II ½ Credit (Wt. 1.5)

Recommendation: ART 1.

This class will explore the use of computer technology to create artwork. Students will learn to use the elements and principles of design in graphic design applications, image manipulation, computer illustration techniques and digital camera use. Students will learn how to use Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and Indesign along with other software titles. These students will learn how to photoshop pictures together and paint on the computer with digital tablets. Video as art will also be explored. There will be tests, projects and semester exams.

DRAWING & PAINTING 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5)

Recommendation: ART1.

This year-long class is for art students who want to seriously develop drawing and painting abilities. Students will explore ways that artists perceive and process visual information in a variety of dry and wet media. Students will start out developing strong skills in drawing from observation and then work into color theory, color mixing and painting techniques. Students will create large scale self-portraits in charcoal, abstract paintings, paintings on canvas, comic book drawings and various other projects. Media used will include charcoal, graphite, ink, tempera, acrylic, watercolor and oil paint. This course is recommended for those interested in attending art school.

JEWELRY 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Recommendation: ART 1.

Polymer clay, wire jewelry, copper enameling, fabrication, and leather work will all be covered. Students will learn to create many types of jewelry that may include rings, pins, pendants, chains, or belt buckles. Beginning glass fusing will be introduced. Continuation of the study of glass fusing with students creating some larger pieces as well as other varieties of glass pieces. Torchwork beads may be introduced. Further work with metals such as copper and brass will be included. Safety in all proceedings will be emphasized. There will be homework and a semester exam.

PHOTOGRAPHY I ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Recommendation: ART 1.

Traditional darkroom photography and digital imagery will be covered in this class. Students will learn to develop film and create black and white photographs in the darkroom. Emphasis will be on composition and experimentation with the media. There will be homework, tests, reports and a semester exam. Projects may require students to do work outside of class. Students will use digital cameras and computers. Some work will be required outside of the classroom.

PHOTOGRAPHY II/DIGITAL IMAGING ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Recommendation: ART 1.

Half of this class will be spent improving darkroom skills learned in Photo I, and the other half will be spent doing digital imaging: photography that is manipulated using Photoshop in the art computer lab. There will be homework, tests, reports and a semester exam. Projects will require students to do work outside of class. A digital camera is recommended.

SCULPTURE ½ Credit (Wt. 1.5)

Recommendation: ART 1.

Students will be introduced to the basic elements and principles of visual organization as they apply to three dimensional art through the use of wire, plaster, clay, wood and other materials. The four basic techniques for creating sculpture: additive, subtractive, manipulative and substitution will be explored. Students will create and keep a sketchbook.

Ceramics I ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Recommendation: Art I. This semester course is for the student who enjoys working three dimensionally with clay. You will create large scale coil pots, functional vessels and cups and a wide array of pottery forms. Students will learn the hand building techniques in ceramics as well as design concepts, basic ceramic terms, equipment and tools.

CERAMICS II ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Recommendation: Ceramics 1.

This semester class is for students who are interested in expanding their knowledge in clay. Students will use the hand building techniques plus the potter’s wheel to form their projects. They will also experiment with glaze formulation, construction techniques and various firing methods. Class size will be limited to 12 students.

PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT ½ Credit (Wt. 1.5)

Recommendation: Art majors should take this course either the 2nd semester of their junior year or the 1st semester of their senior year. This class is for students who are applying to art school. Students will work independently on projects to build the depth and breadth of their portfolio for admission or scholarship competition for college or art school. They will use a variety of media and techniques to fine tune advanced skills in areas chosen jointly by the instructor and student.

Business Department

Courses in our business department are designed to provide students exposure to current computer hardware and software. In addition, opportunities to receive industry-standard credentials and certificates as part of the Information Technology or Business & Finance career pathways for achieving required points toward graduation will be available. Each career pathway toward graduation requires the passage of the ACT WorkKeys exam and a minimum of 12 credential points in the selected career pathway. For more details on these options, talk to your school counselor.

Computer Classes

Courses

COMPUTER CONCEPTS ½ Credit (Wt 1.0), Credential 3

Students will learn concepts and be provided project opportunities related to basic computer hardware, Internet and social media safety and responsibility, word processing, spreadsheets, databases and print publication development. This class will prepare students for the IC3 Digital Literacy Certification exam which provides 3 credential point. This class will also prepare students for the ACT WorkKeys exam for which there is no credential but is required for the alternative career pathway toward graduation. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any business or computer field.

WORD PROCESSING AND PRESENTATIONS ½ Credit (Wt 1.0), Credential 6

Recommendation: Computer Concepts

Students will learn concepts and be provided project opportunities related to document preparation and screen presentations. Topics include formatting text, working with tables and tabs, headers and footer, templates, transitions, animations and design themes. This class will prepare students for the Microsoft Office Specialist exams which provides 3 credential points for each exam. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any business or computer field.

SPREADSHEETS AND DATABASES ½ Credit (Wt 1.0), Credential 6

Recommendation: Computer Concepts

Students will learn concepts and be provided project opportunities related to spreadsheet and database development. Topics include formulas, functions, charts and graphs, table relationships, filters, queries, forms and reports. This class will prepare students for the Microsoft Office Specialist exams which provides 3 credential points for each exam. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any business or computer field.

CCP COMPUTER APPLICATIONS ½ Credit (Wt 2.0)

Recommendation: Successful admission to MTC.

This class will provide students advanced lab opportunities to learn Microsoft Office programs such as Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. Emphasis will be placed projects requiring use of multiple programs. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any business or computer field.

WEBSITE DESIGN 1 Credit (Wt 1.5), Credential 4

Recommendation: Computer Concepts

Students will learn concepts and be provided extensive project opportunities related to site structure, content, visual appearance, image/data editing and placement, site management, CMS, CCS, and HTML. Visual development environments such as Adobe Dreamweaver, Fireworks and Photoshop will be used in this course. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any computer field.

DESKTOP PUBLISHING 1 Credit (Wt 1.5), Credential 4

Recommendation: Computer Concepts

This class will provide students content and lab opportunities related to laying out a document with pages, add and manage objects, insert and format text, create styles, add tables and work with graphics. The goals of the class will be the development of documents and projects for print and publication. Adobe InDesign and Microsoft Publisher are examples of programs to be learned in this class. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any computer field.

Business Classes

Courses

PERSONAL FINANCE ½ Credit (Wt 1.0), Credential 3

Students will learn concepts and be provided project opportunities related to checking accounts, credit cards, stocks, mutual funds, bonds, retirement accounts, insurance, taxes, budgeting, banking and financial safety. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any business field.

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 1 Credit (Wt 1.0)

Recommendation: Personal Finance

Students will learn concepts and be provided project opportunities related to economics, types of business ownership, marketing, management, business ethics, social responsibility and consumer information. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any business field.

MARKETING 1 Credit, (Wt 1.0) , Credential 3

Recommendation: Personal Finance

Students will learn concepts and be provided project opportunities related to market information and research, the marketing mix (product, price, place and promotion), distribution, advertising and communication. Students can focus their study on business marketing and sports/entertainment marketing or specialty. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any business field.

CCP BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 1 Credit (Wt 2.0)

Recommendation: Successful admission to MTC.

This class will provide students content and lab opportunities related to writing business messages, report generation, meeting agendas and presentations, job search and resumes. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any business field. This is a dual-enrollment class. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any business field

ACCOUNTING I 1 Credit (Wt 1.0) , Credential 3

Recommendation: Personal Finance

This class will provide students content and lab opportunities related to journalizing and recording assets, liabilities and equities in addition to the general ledger, cash control systems, financial statements, purchases and cash payments, sales and cash receipts, account receivables and financial statements. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any business field.

BUSINESS AND PERSONAL LAW ½ Credit (Wt 1.0)

Recommendation: Intro to Business.

Students will learn concepts and be provided project opportunities related to personal liability, criminal and civil law, court systems, contracts, property, insurance, wills, trusts, estates, employment law, business ownership and credit responsibilities. This class is a MUST for any student planning a college major in any business field.

English

Communication skills are among the most critical skills that students learn. The ability to read, write, speak, and listen has a direct bearing on the quality of their lives. More than any other ability, the ability to communicate defines the parameters of students’ potential to learn. Therefore, the Marion City Schools has chosen to develop and implement a language arts program that integrates all four of the dimensions named above. The program is organized around structure, meaningful construction, application, and multidisciplinary usage of these dimensions.

Courses

ENGLISH I 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

This course will contain all of the prescribed elements for an integrated program as modeled the Ohio Learning Standards. Students will participate in all forms of the language - writing, reading, speaking, and listening - in an interactive classroom.

ENGLISH II 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

This course will contain all of the prescribed elements for an integrated program as modeled by the Ohio Learning Standards. Students will participate in all forms of our language - writing, reading, speaking, and listening - in an interactive classroom.

ENGLISH III 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

This course will focus on American literature and contains all of the prescribed elements for an integrated program as modeled by the Ohio Learning Standards. Students will participate in all forms of the language - writing, reading, speaking, and listening - in an interactive classroom. A research paper is required.

ENGLISH IV 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

This course focuses on British literature and contains all of the prescribed elements for an integrated program as modeled by the Ohio Learning Standards. Students will participate in all forms of our language -writing, reading, speaking, and listening - in an interactive classroom. A research paper is required.

HONORS ENGLISH 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

The honors level of English I, II, III, and IV is an appropriate choice for college bound students. Coursework will be more rigorous. Students should expect a faster pace. A research paper is required.

AP ENGLISH III LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0) NCAA

In this course students will read and analyze a variety of mostly nonfiction selections from American literature. Through these readings and extensive writing, students will develop a deeper understanding of rhetoric and language.

AP ENGLISH IV LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0) NCAA

This is a course in advanced Senior English which emphasizes the in-depth study of classical literature and composition. It is designed to teach students to learn to be independent critics and judges of the literature of Western Society and to become more proficient analytical writers.

JOURNALISM 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0)

In today’s age of information, journalism is an important course for students preparing to enter any occupation. This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of writing and editing for publication and additionally the computer skills necessary for basic page designs. students will look at the history of the media, how it has affected the world of today and other pertinent issues in newspaper, radio, television and the internet. Students may be required to complete some work after school.

CREATIVE WRITING AND READING ½ Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

This semester course is an interesting and challenging elective offered to the college-bound student. Students will spend considerable time developing a basic foundation in creative writing: prose and poetry, fiction and non-fiction. The course includes the reading, analysis, and writing of various genres. The course will also involve the study of a variety of teacher-selected and student-selected works.

HERALD I (Wt 1.0)/ II (Wt 1.5) 1 Credit

Recommendation: Journalism.

Students in the Harding Herald course are responsible for story and photo assignments, editing and layout (page design) of the school newspaper. Herald students work with other students on story assignments and editing for issues that are printed approximately eight times per year.

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS (CCP) 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0 CCP)

Recommendation: Successful admission to MTC Juniors and Seniors seeking college credit in the realm of communications should consider this option. Marion Technical College curriculum guide describes this course as one that focuses on communication in all areas of life including family, community, and work. The role of creating, maintaining, and ending interpersonal relationships is emphasized.

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS (CCP) 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0 CCP) Harding Campus

Recommendation: Successful admission to MTC.

Juniors and Seniors seeking college credit in the realm of communications should consider this option. Marion Technical College curriculum guide describes this course as one that prepares the student for communication for the job. Topics included are listening, questioning, nonverbal communication and business presentations. Students will be required to give four speeches.

ENGLISH COMPOSITION I ENG1000 MTC 1 Credit - Fall Semester, HHS Campus (Wt. 2.0 CCP)

In this composition course, students will write a variety of essays using research and previous knowledge. This class includes the study of the standards of English grammar, effective organization and style, analysis of writing for logic and reason, and a strong concentration on developing clear and concise writing skills. Students are expected to complete daily reading and writing assignments and volunteer work for the class to view and critique.

ENGLISH COMPOSITION II ENG1100 MTC 1 Credit - Spring Semester, HHS Campus (Wt. 2.0 CCP)

As a continuation of English Composition I, students will expand their knowledge through reading, thinking, and writing assignments. Through essay writing, students will demonstrate their ability to analyze and evaluate ideas and integrate those ideas into their own writing. Students will engage in writing both independently and collaboratively while participating in discussions and reading assigned literature. The course places emphasis on the research essay as a fundamental form of writing in which students will document sources while integrating research into their writing.

ENGLISH 1110.01 OSUM 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0 CCP)

Requirement: Successful admission to OSUM.
Practice in the fundamentals of expository writing, as illustrated in the student's own writing & in the essays of professional writers.

HISTORY OF COMMUNICATION 1101 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0 CCP)

Requirement: Successful admission to OSUM.

History of human communication from the beginning of spoken and written communication to modern mediated and mass communication.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS I 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Recommendation: Teacher recommendation. Telecom is an interactive media lab which introduces students to procedures and practices necessary to produce, direct and perform the capture, and edit a broadcast of a variety of provided media events. Telecom I students will assemble, produce and broadcast a Daily NewsCast for the school announcements.

VIDEO AND PHOTOGRAPHY TECHNOLOGY (TELECOMMUNICATIONS II) 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0 CCP)

Recommendation: Successful admission to MTC.

Students pursue advanced study of audio/video production, analyzing social impacts of media and the development/implementation of creative visualization through media. Whereas students in Telecom I are provided opportunities to capture and edit media events, Telecom II students are encouraged to create unique media events of their own in addition to working collaboratively with Telecom I students as mentors.

Engineering

Courses in the engineering department can also serve a wide variety of student interests. The curriculum adopted for the following classes are from the Project Lead the Way non-profit organization. Project Lead the Way is the nation’s leading provider of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs. Project Lead the Way is helping students develop the skills needed to succeed in the global economy. Their primary goal is to introduce high school students to the world of engineering using math, science, and technology. These classes build upon knowledge and skills learned at Grant Middle School in the Gateway to Technology classes. It is recommended that students take Engineering Design first and Engineering Principles second. Following the completion of these two classes, it is recommended that students interested in additional engineering classes consider “Robotics & Programing” at Harding or if a student is interested in earning college credit and related certifications which can be applied and listed on job applications, they enroll in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering at RAMTEC located on the Tri-Rivers campus.

Courses

ENGINEERING DESIGN 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5)

This year-long course teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process. Models of product solutions are created, analyzed, and communicated using solid modeling computer design software. Students interested in a career in engineering will benefit from this course.

ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5)

Recommendation: Engineering Design

This year-long course helps students understand the field of engineering/ engineering technology. Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics. Additionally, students will learn material properties and electrical, control and fluid power systems. Students will learn to apply problem solving, research and design to create solutions to engineering challenges.

ROBOTICS & PROGRAMMING 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5)

Recommendation: Students should have successfully completed Engineering Principles or teacher recommendation. This year-long course helps students understand the field of engineering, robotics, and programing technology. Students will explore a number of different program languages such as Robot C and P-

Basic. Students will use the VEX Robotics Building System to create robots capable of carrying out identifiable tasks. Because of the expensive equipment, students need to be very responsible.

COMPUTER SCIENCE & SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5)

In CSE, students learn the codes necessary to create apps for mobile devices, automate tasks in a variety of coding languages, including python, while finding patterns in data. The course does not aim to teach mastery of a single programming (coding) language but aims instead to develop computational thinking, to generate excitement about the field of coding and programming while introducing computational tools that foster creativity. The course also aims to build students’ awareness of the tremendous demand for computer specialists and for professionals in all fields who have computational skills. Students collaborate to create programs and present solutions that can improve people’s lives, and weigh the ethical and societal issues of how computing and connectivity are changing the world. This course aligns with the AP Computer Science Principles course and is an elective for the PLTW Engineering Pathway.

Technology Education

Courses in technology education can serve a wide variety of student interests regardless of the educational program (career, technical, college) being pursued. Classes developed around student participation using everything from simple tools to sophisticated computers will make learning fun and inviting. Career exploration could take on new meaning for some students who experience this interesting menu of courses.

Courses

INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

This course provides students the opportunity to learn some of the basics in wood production and fabrication along with lab and tool safety. A large percentage of class time will be spent in the production lab where students will gain experience in the using hand tools, power machinery, and other related equipment.

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY I 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Recommendation: Introduction to Industrial Technology. This year-long course will provide students the opportunity to further their knowledge and abilities in the area of wood working machinery, safety and hand tool safety. Several project will be required and assigned by the instructor. Students will also be able to design and build several projects of their choice. Students will also have the opportunity to work on individual and group projects.

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY II 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Recommendation: Introduction to Industrial Technology, Industrial Technology I. This year-long course will provide students the opportunity to advance their knowledge and abilities in the area of machinery and hand tool safety. Individual project plans are the responsibility of students to skillfully manufacture quality and unique self-chosen projects. Emphasis is placed on advancing woodworking skills, project design, safe working practices, and the economical use of time and materials.

Family Consumer Science

Courses

Principles of Nutrition & Wellness ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

In this course, students will use the principles of nutrition to ensure a healthy body throughout the lifecycle. An emphasis will be placed on planning and preparing meals with an understanding of nutrients and their benefits, portions control and dietary needs. Additional information will include safety, proper use of kitchen equipment, time management and food costs. Out of class assignments are a course requirement.

Introduction to Family Consumer Sciences ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Recommendation: 9th Grade

This first course will provide students with an overview of Family and Consumer Sciences. Students will be introduced to child development, and family relationship concepts. An introduction to food preparation, safety, sanitation, and nutritional meal choices. Additionally, students will identify financial literacy and consumer economic principles. Students will be introduced to the concepts of design through textiles for personal and home use. Throughout the course, students will develop communication, leadership, and career investigation skills.

TRANSITIONS ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

This course will help students prepare for the changes in life. The class topics will help them improve decision making skills and communication skills. Students will also increase their knowledge on job searching skill to help them achieve their goals and be successful.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

In this course, students will study the principles of child growth, development and behavior. An emphasis will be placed on the cognitive development of a child and sensory and motor skills. Additional topics will include skills for dealing with physical, emotional, social and intellectual needs of family members, pregnancy, childhood diseases, immunizations, theories of development, learning styles, and evaluating childcare services. Out of class assignments are a course requirement.

Culinary Fundamentals ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Recommendation: Principles of Nutrition and Wellness

In this course students will apply fundamental culinary techniques, such as knife handling skills, and the recognition, selection and proper use of tools and equipment. Students will apply standard recipe conversions using proper scaling and measurement techniques.

Transitions and Careers ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

In this course students will analyze interest, aptitudes and skills to prepare for careers that transition through life. An emphasis will be placed on work ethics, team building, communication, and leadership skills. Additional topics will include technology etiquette, job search skills, and career planning.

Career and College Readiness ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

In this course, students will develop effective learning strategies and skills to provide a strong foundation for successful lifelong learning. Throughout the course, students will research careers and occupations, review postsecondary admissions qualifications, develop interviewing skills. Additional topics will include principles and techniques of professionalism, networking, conflict-resolution, negotiation, leadership and entrepreneurship. This course may have additional out of class internship opportunities.

Mathematics

Harding High School’s Mathematics course of study is aligned to the Ohio Learning Standards. The standards provide educators across the nation with a shared vision for student achievement.

The following six standards are being taught, practiced, and assessed at each grade level:

●Modeling

●Number and Quantity

●Algebra

●Functions

●Geometry

●Statistics and Probability

It is our intent to provide a curriculum that challenges students of all abilities. We believe that all students can learn mathematics at an appropriate and meaningful level consistent with their abilities. Our sequence is designed for that purpose.

Courses

ALGEBRA I 1 credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

This course will provide students with a variety of opportunities to explore all aspects of Algebra using ConnectEd (on-line book) and ALEKS (supplemental math program). The focus of this course is on the Real Number System, Equations, Inequalities, Polynomials, Functions, Graphing, and Systems of Equations. A high level of emphasis is placed on vocabulary used in each standard. Throughout the course, algebraic concepts are connected to arithmetic skills to build on what students know and corresponding end of course exam problems are practiced. The use of uniform solution strategies and other test-taking skills are emphasized. Successful completion of this course (C or better) is critical for passing the end of course exam and for further development in math in high school and college.

GEOMETRY 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

This course will provide students with a variety of opportunities to explore all aspects of Algebra using ConnectEd (on-line book) and ALEKS (supplemental math program).The focus of this course is on the fifth standard. Geometry and spatial sense, including such topics as geometric proofs, polygons with an emphasis on triangles, circles, surface area, volume, and trigonometry are studied. Further development of the logic laws, critical thinking, and advanced algebra skills is accomplished through the use of applications in preparation for the end of course exam

HONORS ALGEBRA I 1 credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA.

This course will provide students with a variety of opportunities to explore all aspects of Algebra using ConnectEd (on-line book) and ALEKS (supplemental math program). The content reflects the course content expectations as developed by the Ohio Learning Standards for Mathematics. The focus of this course is on Solving Equations & Inequalities, Polynomials, Functions, Graphing, Systems of Equations & Inequalities, Rational Expressions & Equations and an Introduction to Matrices. Throughout the course, algebraic concepts are connected to arithmetic skills to build on what students know and corresponding end of course problems are practiced. This course will explore a deeper depth of knowledge and further critical thinking skills. Successful completion of this course (C or better) is critical for passing the end of course exam and for further development in math in high school and college.

HONORS GEOMETRY 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Recommendation: Algebra I. This course will provide students with a variety of opportunities to explore all aspects of Algebra using ConnectEd (on-line book) and ALEKS (supplemental math program).The focus of this course is on the fifth standard. Geometry and spatial sense, including such topics as geometric proofs, polygons with an emphasis on triangles, circles, surface area, volume, and trigonometry are studied. Further development of the logic laws, critical thinking, and advanced algebra skills is accomplished through the use of applications in preparation for the end of course exam.

ALGEBRA II 1 credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

This course will provide students with a variety of opportunities to explore all aspects of Algebra II using ConnectEd(on-line book) and ALEKS (supplemental math program). This course emphasizes advanced algebra concepts – solving various types of equations; solving systems of equations and the use of matrices; and applications of trigonometry. The successful completion of this course is needed to proceed in the further development of mathematics at the post-secondary level.

ALGEBRA II A 1 credit (Wt 1.0)

Recommendation: Algebra I, Geometry.

This course is the first year of a 2-year Algebra II course sequence. Students must successfully complete all 4 semesters in order to meet NCAA requirements. The course is designed for those students who may struggle with the rigor of a traditional one-year course. The content reflects the course content expectations as developed by the Ohio’s Learning Standards for Mathematics. The course will include but is not limited to in-depth exploration of algebraic and graphic representation of equations, inequalities, radical, and rational functions. Calculations using real numbers and an introduction to matrices and conic sections will be explored.

PERSONAL FINANCE & BUSINESS EXPLORATION 1 credit (Wt 1.0)

This course incorporates project-based learning activities and potential co-op experience. Students will learn how to navigate the financial decisions they may face and to make informed decisions relating to career exploration, budgeting, banking, credit, insurance, spending, taxes, saving and investing, buying/leasing a vehicle and living independently. They also learn the importance of investing in themselves in order to gain the knowledge and skills valued in the marketplace. Development of financial literacy skills and an understanding of economic principles will provide the basis for responsible citizenship, more effective participation in the workforce and career success.

HONORS ALGEBRA II 1 credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Recommendation: Algebra I, Geometry.

This course will provide students with a variety of opportunities to explore all aspects of Algebra II using ConnectEd(on-line book) and ALEKS (supplemental math program)This course emphasizes advanced algebra concepts – solving various types of equations; solving systems of equations and the use of matrices; and applications of trigonometry. The successful completion of this course is needed to proceed in the further development of mathematics at the post-secondary level.

FINANCE with BASIC STATISTICS 1 credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

Recommendation: Algebra II.

The finance portion of the course is designed to assist students in understanding how to manage their own money and to live on their own. Topics will include: purchasing a home, leasing or purchasing a car, banking, credit and debit cards, insurance and other financial matters. The basic statistics portion of the course is designed to help students improve their math skills in preparation for tech school or college.

COLLEGE PREP MATH 1 credit (Wt. 1.00) NCAA

Recommendation: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II.

This course has been developed for students who wish to continue their math experience but do not desire the concentrated study presented in Analytic Geometry and Trigonometry. All strands of integrated mathematics in addition to activities that will assist in preparing for the ACT and SAT college entrance exams are included in this course. Students will explore graphing through the use of a graphing calculator and/or desmos.com

AP STATISTICS 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0) NCAA

Recommendation: Algebra II

This course will focus on these four major areas:

Exploring data (describing patterns and departures from patterns), Sampling and experimentation (planning and conducting a study), Anticipating patterns (exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation), Statistical inference (estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses). Students who successfully complete the course and AP exam may receive credit or advanced placement for an introductory college statistics course.

PRE-CALCULUS 1 credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Recommendation: Algebra II.

This course is designed around the Ohio Learning standards. The major concentrations are in the areas of algebraic functions and graphs, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A graphing calculator is used to investigate topics in this course. Students must have their own graphing calculator.

AP CALCULUS 1 credit (Wt. 2.0) NCAA

Recommendation: Pre-Calculus or Analytic Geometry.

This course is a study of the properties of limits and continuity; derivatives and applications; integration; transcendental functions; and infinite series. A graphing calculator is used to investigate topics in this course. Students who successfully complete the course and AP exam may receive credit or advanced placement for a calculus course in college.

Music

Courses

PREMIER CHOIR 1 Credit (Wt. NA)

This choir of mixed voices, females and males, is made up of students with an interest in singing. Required performances include concerts in the winter and spring, OMEA District Choir Contest, and possibly OMEA State Choir Contest. Optional performances include OMEA Solo and Ensemble Contest, all school musical, and Panorama. The more advanced students are encouraged to audition for the OMEA All-State Choir.

CONCERT CHOIR 1 Credit (Wt. NA)

Recommendation: 8th Grade Choir or Premier Choir. Required performances include concerts in the winter and spring, OMEA District Choir Contest, and possibly OMEA State Choir Contest. Optional performances include OMEA Solo and Ensemble Contest, all school musical, and Panorama. The more advanced students are encouraged to audition for the OMEA All-State Choir.

THE SYMPHONIC CHORALE 1 Credit (Wt. NA)

Recommendation: This choir is an audition-only group. Students must have previous choir experience and be able to read music on solfege.

It is the most advanced choral group scheduled at Harding. Students are challenged with advanced choral music, vocal pedagogy, choral techniques, rehearsal and performance techniques. Required performances include concerts in winter and spring, OMEA District Choir Contest, possibly OMEA State Choir Contest, Harding High School graduation, and other community/school performances scheduled. Optional performances include OMEA Solo and Ensemble Contest, school musical, and Panorama. The more advanced students are encouraged to audition for OMEA All-State Choir.

MUSIC APPRECIATION 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0)

This course is designed to emphasize a general knowledge and understanding of music theory and music history. Students are challenged with an in-depth study of how music is written, time periods it derived from, and how to utilize music theory knowledge into daily practice. There will be required observations and experiences in music.

Students are challenged with an in-depth study of how music is written, time periods it derived from, and how to utilize music theory knowledge into daily practice. There will be required observations and experiences in music.

BAND 1 Credit (Wt. NA)

Harding High School has a single band program throughout the year. During the summer and football seasons the band marches at selected community activities, OMEA marching band adjudicated events and football games. All band students will be required to participate in all out-of-school performances and rehearsals, as scheduled. Immediately after the marching season, the bands are organized into two concert groups – Concert Band and Symphonic Band. Required performances: Football games, OMEA adjudicated concert and marching band festivals, Popcorn/Christmas/Memorial Day Parades, a select number of winter Basketball Pep Band games, spring concert, Harding High School Graduation and any other community/school performances when schedules. Students are encouraged, but not required to participate in OMEA District 2 Solo and Ensemble. The more advanced students are also encouraged to audition for Stardusters Jazz Ensemble, OMEA honor groups and other honor festivals/groups in the area.

CONCERT ORCHESTRA 1 Credit (Wt. NA)

Concert orchestra is a performance-based ensemble comprised of string players. Students will strive to achieve fundamentals of string performance through string pedagogy/techniques, string and full orchestra literature, the use of clinicians, individual sectionals, and rehearsal/concert etiquette. Wind and percussion players will be selected at the discretion of the band and orchestra directors. Required performances: include: Winter/Spring concerts, OMEA contests/festivals, recruiting concerts, and any other performance deemed beneficial to the advancement of the orchestra by the directors. Students are encouraged to participate in OMEA solo and ensemble, HHS musical pit orchestra (by audition), and Panorama.

AP MUSIC THEORY 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0)

Recommendation: Music Appreciation. This course in theory is designed to emphasize an in-depth study of music and its structure. Enrollment is limited to juniors and seniors who wish to pursue a career in music or are serious about music and who want a challenging course taught in a “standard” classroom setting. Objectives of the course are met through lecture, recorded listening, aural training, creative composition, and vocal sight-reading. Student grades will be composed of: classroom participation, homework, quizzes, and tests. Students must provide a 3-ring binder and a notepad of staff paper.

Physical Education

Physical Education offers a wide variety of physical activities and learning experiences, which encourages a lifetime habit of physical activity and fitness. The program is designed to develop the individual’s physical, mental, social, and emotional growth. The P.E. classes use the Ohio Physical Education Standards to assess students’ abilities and levels. Physical Education courses incorporate the Fitness gram Test to test for muscular strength and endurance. The classes will participate in the weight room using universal weight equipment and steppers in a circuit training form to develop total physical fitness. Along with the fitness program students also participate in the following team activities: soccer, speedball, floor hockey, flag football, basketball, volleyball, softball, whiffle ball, kickball, eclipse ball, and team handball. Individual and dual activities included in class are tennis, aerobics, bowling, pickleball, track and field, yoga, and disc golf.

Courses

PHYSICAL EDUCATION I ¼ Credit

The focus of this class is to introduce students to the weight room equipment and new activities at the high school level. Students will be assessed on participation during class, and written assignments. Students will begin to examine their own personal fitness levels and start to brainstorm a fitness plan for the future. Students will become familiar with new vocabulary and understand the different muscle groups of the body. Students will complete a marketing campaign for an activity of their choice. Students are required to change clothes for class each day of the semester. This class is graded as pass/fail. Students with medical issues over the course of the semester will have alternate work given for participation grades.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION II ¼ Credit

Recommendation: Physical Education I

Students will continue to improve upon their physical fitness levels while developing a complete fitness plan with implementation in class. Students will complete a biomechanical assessment of their peers during a sport or activity. Students will be assessed on participation during class, and written assignments. Students will begin to examine their own personal fitness levels and start to brainstorm a fitness plan for the future. Students are required to change clothes for class each day of the semester. This class is graded as pass/fail. Students with medical issues over the course of the semester will have alternate work given for participation grades.

ADVANCED PHYSICAL TRAINING ¼ Credit (Wt. NA)

This course will help student athletes develop physically. Athletes will demonstrate knowledge of total fitness/lifelong fitness while utilizing proper training techniques. Students in this class will gain awareness of their individual fitness level, and will be pushed to achieve higher levels of physical fitness and athletic ability. This course will serve as an alternative to after school weight lifting. This course is designed to introduce safety, proper technique, and benefits of physical training. Student progression will include: An introduction to advanced safety principles, training techniques, benefits of physical training, implementation of strength, balance, and conditioning programs, aerobic/anaerobic activities to gain strength, knowledge and skills to develop total fitness, including the health and skill-related components of fitness. An introduction to lifelong fitness and total wellness through the use of aerobic/anaerobic activities and weight training. Students will be pushed to implement the gained experience to enhance current levels of fitness and athleticism.

CREDIT OPTIONS FOR HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION CREDIT

High school students who participate in two full seasons of a sport, marching band, or cheerleading will meet the physical education requirement for graduation. While this option meets the requirement for high school physical education, no high school credit will be granted toward graduation. In order to meet the graduation requirement a student must successfully complete two semesters (½ credit) of PE or two full seasons of participation in a sport, marching band, or cheerleading. One of each will not meet the requirement.

Health

HEALTH ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Health concerns total exploration of the physical, mental and social aspects of growing into adulthood. The course focuses on preventive health measures by explaining proper techniques and practice in self-care. Specific areas of study include: Peer and Family Relationships and Dating Violence, Family Life Education - including birth control, STI, STD, AIDS, Drug Education - Alcohol and Tobacco Abuse, Drugs (over the counter, illegal, and prescription drugs), First Aid - Basic Anatomy, Physiology, Mental/ Emotional Health Behavior and Stress and Conflict Resolution Skills, and Nutrition/Fitness

Science

Courses

BIOLOGY I 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0)

topics including cells, genetics, heredity, and ecology. Through this course you will understand how your cells divide, how traits are passed from your parents to you, how organisms have changed over time, and the importance of our ecosystem and the organisms that live there. Furthermore, this course will provide you was a good foundation for future Life Science courses, such as Biology II, Anatomy and Physiology, Environmental Science, etc.

HONORS BIOLOGY I 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Honors Biology is the study of life and covers a multitude of topics including cells, genetics, heredity, and ecology. Through this course you will understand how your cells divide, how traits are passed from your parents to you, how organisms have changed over time, and the importance of our ecosystem and the organisms that live there. The Honors curriculum will challenge the student acquire knowledge independently, to master abstract concepts, and apply content to new situations. Furthermore, this course will provide you strong foundations for future Life Science courses, such as Biology II, Anatomy and Physiology, Environmental Science, etc.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

The year starts with a bang as the big bang theory, the evolution of stars, and the beginning of all matter are explored. Matter and changes to matter are investigated for the first semester. The second semester focuses on introductory physics concepts such as Newton’s laws and energy.

HONORS PHYSICAL SCIENCE 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

The year starts with a bang as the big bang theory, the evolution of stars, and the beginning of all matter are explored. Matter and changes to matter are investigated for the first semester. The second semester focuses on introductory physics concepts such as Newton’s laws and energy. The topics in this course are similar to the regular physical science class; however more details and mathematical computations are required. Algebra I skills are required. This course provides a solid foundation for students who will be taking chemistry and physics in their subsequent years.

HONORS BIOLOGY II 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Recommendation: Biology I. Biology II Honors provides an excellent opportunity for an in-depth study of life science. Areas of study will include genetics, evolution of life, cells, and viruses. This course is recommended for the college-bound student who has special interests in the life sciences and the medical field.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

Recommendation: Biology I.

Are you concerned about the world? Do you like to go outside and study nature? Do you want to better understand the complex environmental issues of today? If so, Environmental Science may be for you. We study ecological concepts of plant and animal relationships, food, and population. Climate change, hybrid cars, and renewable energy will also be topics of discussion. Emphasis will be placed on human populations and the resulting environmental impacts. We will incorporate the Harding Prairie and Wetland Lab and will often be required to do hiking and outdoor activities. Be an environmentally aware citizen of the world - sign up for Environmental Science.

HONORS ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA Recommendation: Biology I.

Recommendation: Biology I.

Are you looking for a hands-on, project-based science class? Do you like to go outside and study nature? Do you want to better understand the complex environmental issues of today? This is a fast-paced version of environmental sciences that will look deeper into current issues with a greater focus on environmental policy and application. We will incorporate the Harding Prairie and Wetland Lab and will often be required to do hiking and outdoor activities. If you are ready for a challenging exploration of the world around you, sign up for Environmental Science Honors.

EARTH SCIENCE 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

Recommendation: Completion of at least one (1) science class.

If you are interested in learning more about our last frontier, to study about areas where no man has gone before, then Earth Science is for you. A variety of areas such as meteorology, oceanography, and geology are included in this course. Laboratory experiments will provide some very interesting educational experiences. Projects will allow you to demonstrate your learning using different media.

CHEMISTRY 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

Recommendation: Algebra I

Chemistry is a class that continues the objectives started in the physical sciences. This course explores the science of matter changing phase and composition. Subjects for study include scientific notation, the atomic model, nuclear reactions, electron configurations, the periodic table, chemical bonds, nomenclature (naming), stoichiometry, solutions, reaction kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, energy, and the gas laws. In addition, many laboratory experiences will help students understand the science of Chemistry.

HONORS CHEMISTRY 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Recommendation: Algebra I

Honors Chemistry is a course that follows physical science and focuses on learning objectives that go beyond the Ohio Standards for Chemistry. In addition to the Chemistry course, this honors class extends these topics to include weighted averages for isotope, hybridization of molecules, limiting reactant in stoichiometric problems, Arrhenius and Bronsted-Lowry acids and bases, equilibrium equations, reaction kinetic equations, enthalpy equations for phase changes, enthalpy of stoichiometry, gas stoichiometry, titrations, and pH logarithms. In addition, many laboratory experiences will be included that require writing full experiment reports without the scaffolding of a typical experiment worksheet used in chemistry.

COLLEGE CHEMISTRY (CCP) 1 Credit (Wt.2.0)

Recommendation: Chemistry

Prerequisite: Successful admission to MTC.

This course is appropriate for students interested in pursuing careers in science, medicine and engineering. This course takes a more focused look at the concepts learned in Chemistry. High school students will be given 8 credit hours through MTC for completing this course. Topics include matter and measurement; structures of atoms, molecules and ions; inorganic chemical nomenclature; chemical reactions and stoichiometry, acid-base and oxidation-reduction; gas laws; thermochemistry; electronic structure; periodic properties of the elements, chemical bonding, molecular geometry and chemical bonding theories. Laboratory exercises reinforce basic chemistry principles and emphasize analytical techniques. It should be noted that a C or better is required to advance to the next science course at MTC.

PHYSICS 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

Recommendation: Algebra I, Geometry.

A unique thematic approach will be taken to the basic topics in physics. Unit 1 will focus on describing motion mathematically, using vectors and forces. Students will study these topics through the construction and launching of model rockets while analyzing their motion. Unit 2 will continue the rocket theme but focus on energy transformations, gravity and planetary motion. Unit 3’s

focus will be electricity and motors, again students will have a project. The theme of Unit 4 will be space exploration with the focus on telescopes, light, and lenses.

HONORS PHYSICS 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Recommendation: Algebra I, Geometry

Physics includes the study of motion, forces, momentum, energy, waves, light, electricity and magnetism. Students will be guided through many laboratory experiences to foster their inquiry, reasoning, analysis and communication skills. Algebra skills will be necessary for success in this course. This honors class extends these

topics to include evaluating forces on inclined planes, Kepler’s laws, sound waves and its properties, heat and calorimetry problems, applying the right hand rule to electricity and magnetism problems, applying principles of electroacoustics to construct a simple speaker.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Recommendation: Biology I.

Interested in a medical field such as physical therapy, veterinarian, or becoming a doctor or nurse? Are you thinking of a career in any health care field? If so, Anatomy and Physiology is the class for you. In this course students will take in-depth looks at the structure and the functions of the human body. Body systems such as the skeletal, muscular, nervous, excretory and digestive, are studied to explore their role in the maintenance of the whole organism. This course is recommended for the college-bound student interested in any area of health care including medicine, physical therapy, sports medicine, etc. Dissection of a cat is required.

FORENSIC SCIENCE 1/2 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

Recommendation: Completion of at least one (1) science course.

Are you a fan of “C.S.I,” “Monk,” and “Law and Order?” Do you like to solve mysteries and interpret evidence from the scene of the crime? Are you interested in a career in forensic sciences? Then this is the class for you. Topics for study include history of forensics, various print analysis, ballistics, DNA, trace evidence, handwriting analysis, and data collection and preservation. Laboratory experiences will support the connection between science and real life. This course will show how the structure of atoms, interaction of energy and matter, and chemical reactions all help to solve crimes.

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0 CCP)

Prerequisite: Successful admission to MTC.

Forensic Science, Criminology 1500. This course provides a basic study of the theory and practice of crime scene reconstruction with emphasis placed on criminal evidence processing. Further, the student will examine procedures used by law enforcement agencies and crime labs in crime scene processing to include investigative techniques needed for special criminal offenses involving violent offenses and/or property crimes. This course introduces the student to basic forensic procedures used by law enforcement during the investigative process. The course includes topics in basic biology and chemistry.

INTEGRATED SCIENCE EXPLORATION 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0)

Project based learning opportunities will be incorporated into a qualitative based science class. First semester foundations of biology will be extended with topics such as, climate and climate change, infectious diseases, carbon chemistry, cell structure, heredity, and cells. Second semester students will be challenged to extend their physical science knowledge through project based learning activities involving motion, sound, light and electricity.

Social Studies

Courses

AMERICAN HISTORY 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

U.S. Studies from 1877 to the Present: Post-Reconstruction through the 20th century.

Students will continue the chronological study of the history of the United States with emphasis on domestic affairs. This study incorporates each of the seven standards: history, people in society, geography, economics, government, citizenship rights and responsibilities, and social studies skills and methods. As students study historic eras, they consider the geographic, cultural, economic, and governmental changes that have occurred. Students develop a deeper understanding of their role as citizens and continue to expand their command of social studies skills and methods.

HONORS AMERICAN HISTORY 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

U.S. Studies from 1877 to the Present: Post-Reconstruction through the 20th century.

Students will continue the chronological study of the history of the United States with emphasis on domestic affairs. Student performance will be evaluated against more stringent criteria than would be normally true of a non-weighted course. A student in an honors course is expected to demonstrate higher performance levels with respect to critical thinking skills and writing skills.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY .5 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

Early Revolutions – Enlightenment through the Bolshevik Revolution.This study incorporates each of the seven standards: history, people in society, geography, economics, government, citizenship rights and responsibilities, and social studies skills and methods. As students study historic eras, they consider the influence of geographic settings, cultural perspectives, economic systems, and various forms of government. Students gain a deeper understanding of the role of citizens and continue to develop their research skills.

HONORS MODERN WORLD HISTORY .75 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

World studies from 1750 to the present: Age of Enlightenment through the 20th century.

This study incorporates each of the seven standards: history, people in society, geography, economics, government, citizenship rights and responsibilities, and social studies skills and methods. As students study historic eras, they consider the influence of geographic settings, cultural perspectives, economic systems, and various forms of government. Students gain a deeper understanding of the role of citizens and continue to develop their research skills.

AMERICAN HISTORY: 20TH CENTURY POPULAR CULTURE 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Recommendation: American History.

Popular Culture is a humanities course that studies the day-to-day life of Americans. It is an in-depth study of culture: how people entertained themselves, how they spend their leisure time, how new technologies affected their lives, as well as their art, media, literature, music, dance, movies, and fashion. This class is writing intensive and activity based with an emphasis on creative thinking. Two decades are explored each nine weeks, starting with the 1920s and concluding with the 1990s. Performance expectations will be commensurate with the course weight.

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

Recommendation: American History

Topics covered include philosophy of government, comparative world governments, national, state and local governments within the United States, as well as special emphasis on current affairs as they relate to the role and purpose of government today.

HONORS AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Recommendation: American History

This is a honors course where student performance will be evaluated against a more stringent criteria than in a non-weighted course. A student in a honors course is expected to demonstrate higher performance levels with respect to critical thinking skills and writing skills. The above description of American Government applies with a more in-depth study.

AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT & POLITICS 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0) NCAA

Recommendation: American History. This course is an advanced, in-depth study of U.S. government focusing on the following units: constitutional underpinnings of the United States government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups and mass media; institutions of national government: the Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the federal courts; public policy; and civil rights and civil liberties. This course is designed to prepare a student for the Advanced Placement Exam in addition to becoming an active, knowledgeable, contributing citizen.

ECONOMICS ½ Credit (Wt.1.0) NCAA

Economics is the study of how individuals, business, and governments make decisions about the use of scarce resources in a world of unlimited wants and needs. The course will be designed to engage students in basic economic concepts revolving around the fundamentals of economics, microeconomics, macroeconomics, and international trade. The course is useful in helping students establish a foundation for more advanced study of economics.

SOCIOLOGY ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

This semester course surveys certain core concepts composing the study of groups and human relationships. The goals of the course include thinking like a sociologist, developing your sociologist imagination, and appreciating cultural diversity.

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0)

This semester course surveys the psychological study of behavior including the methods of inquiry and evaluation used by psychologists. It also contains information relating to issues that all individuals personally encounter in human development. Study should lead to more understanding and tolerance for individual differences. Students should not take this course if they plan on taking the full-year course of Psychology.

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY & DIVERSITY– ½ Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

The course will explore African American culture and society through art, music, literature, and current events. Students would benefit from this course by understanding the development of the culture’s past and its relationship to the present. This class also explain why society has stereotypes, and educate students about the many forms of diversity in our society. This class will offer students opportunities to give reactions and support opinions.

CONTEMPORARY WORLD ISSUES ½ credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

Students will study current world issues considering the dynamics of global interactions among nations and regions as well as present issues that affect all humanity. These dynamics include competing beliefs and goals, methods of engagement, and conflict and cooperation. Contemporary issues have political, economic, social, historic, and geographic components. Approaches to addressing global and regional issues reflect historical influences and multiple perspectives.

HISTORY OF MARION, OHIO ½ credit (Wt. 1.0)

In this class, students will be exposed to the long and distinguished history of the city of Marion, Ohio. Covering a time span from its founding in 1822 to the present, this class will introduce members to the important people, places and events that have made Marion an influential community from the earliest days of America’s agrarian society, through industrialization and in to the modern technological age. Gaining a newfound respect for their hometown, students should expect a challenging course that includes guest speakers, on-site learning and project based research.

PSYCHOLOGY 1100 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0 CCP)

Successful admission to OSUM. A prerequisite to advanced courses; a broad survey of psychological science. Application of the scientific method to the empirical study of behavior with emphasis on individual and cultural differences

INTRODUCTORY TO SOCIOLOGY 1101 1 Credit (Wt. 2.0 CCP)

Successful admission to OSUM. Fundamental concepts of sociology and introduction to the analysis of social problems and interactions (e.g. wealth, gender, race, inequality, family, crime) using sociological theories.

CRIMINOLOGY 1500 1 Credit (2.0 CCP)

Prerequisite: Successful admission to MTC. This course is an in-depth study of the nature of crime, its causes, and crime statistics. This course includes information about violent crime, property crime, morality crime, and organized crime. The course also includes a study of ways to prevent crime.

INTRODUCTION CRIMINAL JUSTICE CRJ1000 1 Credit (2.0 CCP)

Prerequisite: Successful admission to MTC. This course is an overview of Criminal Justice Careers. Topics include federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies, corrections, and court systems. Students will also explore the role of the Homeland Security agency.

World Languages

Students are encouraged to discuss world language selection with parents and guidance counselors. The study of a world language can be a very enjoyable experience for students who are willing to put forth the effort for this valuable program. A minimum of two years in one language is normally recommended for entrance to colleges and universities. Employers want employees who can function in another language and who are sensitive to other cultures. Therefore world language experiences can be valuable to you in any career choice.

* Any student who has taken a level 3 language course (or higher) has the option to take a credit placement test through the Ohio State University at Marion. Based on the score obtained, students can receive college credit applicable at any state college/university. For more information, please contact your language teacher.

Courses

FRENCH I 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

This introduction to the French language stresses the four skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. The ability to communicate in a language other than English is an important factor of French I. Tolerance for cultural and linguistic differences is developed as well as an increased understanding of the English language and culture. An introduction to the French speaking world, including its culture, geography, and history, is an integral part of the first year class.

FRENCH II 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

Prerequisite: French I. The material covered in French I is thoroughly reviewed and reinforced in French II. The communication skills of writing and speaking are stressed at this level. In addition, the student will increase his/her ability to comprehend both the written and spoken language. More in-depth instruction in French culture, geography, and history is presented in French II.

FRENCH III 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Prerequisite: French II.

This is a review and a reinforcement of the learning done in French I and French II. Correct grammar is stressed with communication and understanding still being emphasized. Oral and written activities emphasizing all communication skills in French are done. Culture is part of each lesson. More emphasis is placed on being able to communicate in modern French when going to college abroad or traveling in Quebec, France, or other French- speaking areas of the world.

FRENCH IV 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Prerequisite: French III.

This is a study of French culture, history, and literature. Final grammar points are covered along with a comprehensive grammar review. Emphasis is placed on oral and conversational French.

SPANISH I 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

The principal goal of the study of Spanish is to effectively communicate one’s thoughts, needs, wants and reactions in another language. The course concentrates on a balance of correct written and oral understanding and reproduction of the target language. Time is spent learning the culture of the Spanish-speaking world by incorporating basic vocabulary and grammar concepts into reading and exploring the people and countries where Spanish is spoken.

SPANISH II 1 Credit (Wt. 1.0) NCAA

Prerequisite: Spanish I.

The second year of Spanish starts with a review of all major grammatical items presented in the first level course. The listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are further developed in present and past verb tenses.


Cultural material based on the life and customs of Spanish-speaking peoples is presented. Students prepare dialogues, skits, sing songs, and practice pronunciation.

SPANISH III 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Prerequisite: Spanish II

This is a study of historical and contemporary culture in Spanish-American countries and Spain. Through small and large group discussion using the Spanish language, through speaking, reading and writing, exercises utilize any and all grammar concepts. Communication in the target language is emphasized in all skill areas and may include written reports and oral presentations of skills and plays.

SPANISH IV/SPANISH V 1 Credit (Wt. 1.5) NCAA

Prerequisite: Spanish III

This is a continuation and extension of activities of Spanish III, but on a more in-depth level, particularly for vocabulary building. Oral, written and reading activities emphasize the literary, cultural and historic characteristics of the Spanish-speaking areas of the world.

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